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stopmotion puppet "The Longest War"

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I designed and built this puppet model as the main character in an animation short.
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  • The Longest War
  • The design and building process leading to a stop-motion robot puppet.  
    The final puppet model is made of resin, vinyl, found object, aluminum, brass, bronze and steel.   In all, 23 silicone molds were made and 35 resin pieces were cast (some were cast twice for left and right side parts).  Including the resin parts and the armature(screws, pins, stoppers, plates etc) the model consists of ~400 pieces that are either glued, press fit, brazed or screwed together.
  • A concept sketch. 
  •  Starting to build the mock-up model.
    Most of the design process takes place here.
  • The concept model painted grey. Next up... turning it into a stopmotion puppet!
  • The modified pieces are now ready to accept stopmotion joints. They will be molded and cast out of resin.
  • Most of the armature parts will be inserted in the silicone molds before casting the final robot pieces out of resin.
  • The silicone block molds and the armature pieces together.  
  • The biggest mold for the torso was a two piece matrix mold with a fibreglass jacket.
    The matrix mold allows for slushing and results in a hollow cast which saves on weight. 
    The torso armature part inserted in the matrix mold before casting (above).
  • The fingers are build with brass stock, modified vinil hinges, found object, wire housing and screws/nuts.
  • The silicone molds walls were covered with aluminum coloring powder and then filled with resin.  The resin fused with the alluminum powder to make a very durable and uniform aluminum coating.  Following, about a third of the model was masked and then sprayed with camel-yellow.
  • The chip-off method was used to make it look worn and beaten. Several other 
    weathering techniques were employed, some of which involved a torch, hammer, 
    "random dirt particles added in the molds", lots of enamel washes and a dark leather 
    wash for added contrast. Some rust colors were also used (Testors & Gunze Sangyo) 
    as well as the micro-mark "rusting" kit, "Rustall".
  • A red LED eye on the head to give it a bit more oomph.
  • Hard at work... Animating!
  • Second motion test!
  •     The firsts walk cycle! 
  • ***If you liked it, you can hit the "appreciate" button or leave a comment below***

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